Tell Us Your Story: Ted Moorman

Tell Us Your Story: Ted Moorman

Here at TNM, we have a large community of people who are inspired by our words, tips, and real world advice. Last month we featured three of our contributing editors who help us generate content. This month we are featuring some members of our greater community who are equally as inspiring through the Tell Us Your Story: Young Professional Series here on our blog. These people have found their Niche, and want to share their story with you. Our third feature is young professional Ted Morman, who picked up and moved to Dc in order to switch from a long career in teaching finance to target careers in kleptocracy, foreign corruption, and illicit finance.

Tell Us Your Story: Matthew Griffin of Combat Flip Flops

Tell Us Your Story: Matthew Griffin of Combat Flip Flops

Matthew Griffin, Griff for short, is an Army Ranger and business owner who always seeks to make the world a better place. From the time Griff was 5 years old, he knew he wanted to be an Airborne Ranger. He notes that this was “stressful, but achievable. After going through challenges like that at a young age and seeing the benefits of success, it makes you want to take on bigger challenges.” Take on bigger challenges is exactly what he did and has continued to do through his leadership, business, and hobbies ever since. He eventually wanted to transition to a career that enabled him to help others in a different way and felt passionate about promoting peace. Currently, Griff is CEO of Combat Flip Flops, a company he founded with a fellow Army Ranger. The company’s mission is “To create peaceful, forward-thinking opportunities for self-determined entrepreneurs affected by conflict. Our willingness to take bold risks, community connection, and distinct designs communicate, ‘Business, Not Bullets’—flipping the view on how wars are won. Though Persistence, respect, and creativity, we empower the mindful consumer to manufacture peace through trade.” 

Fireside Chat - Stacy Campesi of SLC Coaching 6.6.17

Fireside Chat - Stacy Campesi of SLC Coaching 6.6.17

On Tuesday June 6th, 2017, we sat down with Stacy Campesi a good friend of TNM and founder of SLC Coaching. 

On Tuesday June 6th, 2017, we sat down with Stacy Campesi a good friend of TNM and founder of SLC Coaching. 

We talked about how to get out of "career rock bottom?"  Better yet, how do you make time for yourself once you are thriving. In this fireside chat, Kevin interviews Stacy on her own professional journey and career transition all the way to what red flags to look for while interviewing.

We talked about how to get out of "career rock bottom?"  Better yet, how do you make time for yourself once you are thriving. In this fireside chat, Kevin interviews Stacy on her own professional journey and career transition all the way to what red flags to look for while interviewing.

Hurry Up and Fail

Hurry Up and Fail

In my youth I feared failure. I feared failing tests, losing games, or simply being denied something. I knew what I wanted and how I could get it, but my mind was constantly focused on the failures that could result. I rarely envisioned the possible successes but rather the embarrassment of a failure. When I studied for a test it was to avoid failure. In sports, I practiced to not lose in front of my friends and family. I was motivated by fear.  My success was directly linked to a negative premise of failure. I used this mindset to propel me to excell at times but when I experienced a loss the negative mindset appeared. I was a sore loser but I was also a questionable winner. As I matured I began to see things differently. I saw that losing is opportunity to self evaluate and tweak some things to be better prepared for my next test. I learned that I had to be willing to take a risk to grow. Take a chance with change or simply to fall down, in order to truly learn how to stand properly.

Staying Connected While Working From Home

Staying Connected While Working From Home

Here at the Niche Movement, we realize that what works the best for one person might, and probably does not, work the best for the next person. So, we are all for finding the best possible solution! That being said, many young people, are finding that it is most effective for both their quality of life and quality of work to work from home. It may seem hard for one who works from home to truly be a part of the company, which is definitely a valid concern. I, as a freshman in college can vouch for the fact that millennials have inevitably become used to building and maintaining relationships through technology. The steps below, paired with many young people's pre existing can easily work together to create the ideal work from home relationship. With a little extra effort, proper utilization of the available resources will lead to the desired work-life balance.